Why I won’t recommend Signal anymore

Why I won’t recommend Signal anymore
By Sander Venema
Nov 5 2016
https://sandervenema.ch/2016/11/why-i-wont-recommend-signal-anymore/

One of the things I do is cryptography and infosec training for investigative journalists who have a need to keep either their sources and communications confidential so they can more safely do their work in the public interest. Often they work in places which are heavily surveilled, like Europe, or the United States. Ed Snowden’s documents explain a thing or two about how the US intelligence apparatus goes about its day-to-day business. They sometimes also work in places in the world where rubber hose cryptanalysis is more common than in say the U.S. or Europe. Which is why crypto tools alone are not the Alpha and the Omega of (personal) security. This requires careful consideration of what to use when, and in what situation. One of the things I have recommended in the past for various cases is the OpenWhisperSystems’ app called Signal, available for Android and iOS. In this article, I want to explain my reasons why I won’t be recommending Signal in the future.

To be clear: the reason for this is not security. To the best of my knowledge, the Signal protocol is cryptographically sound, and your communications should still be secure. The reason has much more to do with the way the project is run, the focus and certain dependencies of the official (Android) Signal app, as well as the future of the Internet, and what future we would like to build and live in. This post was mostly sparked by Signal’s Giphy experiment, which shows a direction for the project that I wouldn’t have taken. There are other, bigger issues which deserve our attention.

What is Signal?

Signal is an app published by OpenWhisperSystems, a company run by Moxie Marlinspike. It has published an official Signal app for Google Android, and Apple iOS. Signal has been instrumental in providing an easy-to-use, cryptographically secure texting and calling app. It is a combination of the previously separate apps TextSecure and Redphone, which were combined into one app called Signal.

One of the main reasons why I recommended it previously to people was that it was easy to use, next to the cryptographic security. This is one good thing Signal has going for it. People could just install it and then communicate securely. Cryptographic software needs to be much more simple to use, and use securely, and Signal is doing its thing on the mobile platforms to create an easy-to-use secure messaging platform. I do appreciate them for that. I wanted to get that out of the way.

Multiple problems with Signal

There are however, multiple issues with Signal, namely:

• Lack of federation
• Dependency on Google Cloud Messaging
• Your contact list is not private
• The RedPhone server is not open-source

I’ll go into these one at a time.

Lack of federation

There is a modified version of Signal called LibreSignal, that removed the Google dependency from the Signal app, allowing Signal to be run on other (Android) devices, like CopperheadOS, or Jolla phones (with Android compatibility layer). In May this year, however, Moxie made it clear that he does not want LibreSignal to use the Signal servers, and that he does not approve of the name. The name is something that can change, that is not a problem. What is a problem, however, is the fact that he does not want LibreSignal to use the Signal servers. Which would be fine if he allowed LibreSignal to federate across using their own servers. This was tried once (with Telegram, of all people) but subsequently abandoned, because Moxie believes it slows down changes to the app and/or protocol.

The whole problem with his position however, is that I don’t see the point of doing any of this secure messaging stuff, without having federation. The internet was built on federation. Multiple e-mail providers and servers for instance, can communicate effortlessly with one another, so I can send an e-mail to someone who has a Gmail address or a corporate address, etc. without effort and it all works. This works because of federation, because the protocols are all open standards and there are multiple implementations of the standards who can cooperate and communicate together. Another example would be the Jabber/XMPP protocol, which also has multiple clients on multiple platforms who can communicate securely with one another, despite one having a Jabber account on another server than the other.

If we don’t federate, if we don’t cooperate, what is there to stop the internet from becoming a bunch of proprietary walled gardens again? Is the internet then really nothing more than just a platform for us to use certain proprietary silo services on? Signal then, just happens to be a (partly proprietary) silo on which your messages are transmitted securely.

Dependency on Google Cloud Messaging

Currently, the official Signal client depends on Google Cloud Messaging to work correctly. The alternative that has been developed by the people of LibreSignal has removed that dependency, so people running other software, like Jolla or CopperheadOS can run Signal. Unfortunately, the policy decisions of OpenWhisperSystems and Moxie Marlinspike make it so that it became impossible to reliably run unofficial Signal clients that use the same server infrastructure, so people can communicate. Also, federation, like explained in the previous section, is expressly hindered and prohibited by OpenWhisperSystems, so it is not an option for LibreSignal to simply run their own servers and then federate within the wider Signal network, allowing people to contact each other across clients.

[snip]

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