Netflix’s biggest competitor? Sleep

Netflix’s biggest competitor? Sleep
Uber v self-driving cars, Facebook v video games. Some of the tech industry’s biggest rivalries are not what you would expect
By Alex Hern
Apr 18 2017
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/apr/18/netflix-competitor-sleep-uber-facebook

When you’re a globe-spanning technology firm, you need to keep a paranoid eye on the competition. But sometimes it can be hard to work out what the competition is: disruption can come from the most unlikely corners.

But even given that, Netflix has an odd definition of what it has to compete with. Not Amazon Video, not YouTube, not even old-fashioned broadcasters. No, according to the company’s chief executive, Reed Hastings, Netflix’s biggest competitor is the pesky human need to close your eyes and sleep for a third of the day.

Asked about the company’s competitors at Netflix’s earnings call, Hastings said that he isn’t really concerned about Amazon and HBO “because the market is just so vast”. 

“You know, think about it, when you watch a show from Netflix and you get addicted to it, you stay up late at night. We’re competing with sleep, on the margin. And so, it’s a very large pool of time.”

The company and its more traditional competitors, he said, are like “two drops of water in the ocean of both time and spending for people”. 

“And so Amazon could do great work, and it would be very hard for it to directly affect us. It’s just — home entertainment is not a zero-sum game. And again, HBO’s success, despite our tremendous success, is a good way to illustrate that.”

Netflix isn’t the only company to have an unusual idea of who it’s competing with. Perhaps the most famous – or infamous – example in recent years is Uber, which realised a few years before everyone else that its true rival wasn’t fellow cab app Lyft, but Google’s self-driving car project.

The company has argued that an in-house autonomous driving capability is crucial to its long-term success as a company. “If we are not tied for first” to develop the technology, Uber’s chief executive Travis Kalanick said last year, “then the person who is in first, or the entity that’s in first, then rolls out a ride-sharing network that is far cheaper or far higher-quality than Uber’s, then Uber is no longer a thing.”

In Uber’s stated vision of the future, the only thing that’s important is surviving long enough to fire all its drivers and replace them with robots. And, to a certain extent, the company is right. If another company develops, or licenses, self-driving car technology before Uber’s own in-house product is ready, it will be very easy for them to undercut the company on price – a disaster for a market as sensitive to small differences in cost as cab hire.

Sometimes, tech firms have a different view of their competition than everyone else because of the sheer scale on which they operate. Google may think Google+ is a Facebook competitor, for instance; but Facebook thinks its competitors are video games and TV. You aren’t going to leave Facebook for another social network, and it knows that, so its job is to maximise the amount of time you actually spend using it. For that, it needs to be more compelling than all the other things you could be doing with your time.

[snip]

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