We’re Thinking about Cybersecurity All Wrong

[Note:  This item comes from friend Steve Goldstein.  DLH]

We’re Thinking about Cybersecurity All Wrong
Obama’s former cyber advisor, Michael Daniel, on how we need to overhaul the way we manage the new “tool for statecraft.”
By Mike Orcutt
Jul 31 2017
https://www.technologyreview.com/s/608335/were-thinking-about-cybersecurity-all-wrong/

Michael Daniel has a unique perspective on today’s chaotic world of cybersecurity. Fresh off a four-year stint as President Obama’s top cyber advisor, Daniel is now president of the Cyber Threat Alliance, a nonprofit team of cybersecurity companies building a platform for sharing information about common threats. MIT Technology Review caught up with Daniel at the Black Hat computer security conference in Las Vegas last week. What follows is an edited transcript of the discussion.

You’ve seen the cybersecurity challenge from the perspective of both the government and now the private sector. How would you describe the moment we are in right now?

Where we are right now is that more and more countries are beginning to incorporate cyber capabilities into their tools of statecraft. We need to recognize that it is going to become a tool of statecraft, not just for the U.S. and the high-end players like Russia, China, Israel, and Great Britain, but for almost everybody. As a result, we need to begin to think through how we set up norms of behavior and rules of the road, so that this is not destabilizing.

Criminals as well as nation-states are getting more sophisticated in their cyber operations. What role can the Cyber Threat Alliance play in addressing this?

At its broadest level, CTA is an information sharing and analysis organization, one that is focused on the vendor and the cybersecurity provider community. There’s not really another organization that does this sort of work. Fundamentally, CTA is about doing two things. First, can we change how competition occurs in the cybersecurity industry to make it more beneficial to the whole? Instead of continuing to compete on “my inadequate pool of data is bigger than your inadequate pool of data,” we need to have shared our pools of data, and the competition should be on “I do better things with the data”—I’m faster, or I integrate with your company better, or I understand your business model better—whatever it is. That’s a higher-value level of competition. Everybody will be better off.

Second, by combining the information we can start to actually map out more effective ways to disrupt the bad guys, and do it across their entire business process. This is not about a kid in his basement; that’s not the real threat. These are organizations that run like businesses, and we need to start thinking about it in terms of disrupting their business models.

But will that approach work if the attacker is a nation-state adversary?

Yes and no. At one level, the idea of producing a playbook would work just as well for a nation-state adversary. Now, their motivations are different. Most nation-states are willing to invest time and money in a way that a criminal organization both won’t and can’t, so the impact that you may be able to have may be different. But you can still impose costs on them and slow them down.

Ultimately, though, the private sector will need to find new ways to cooperate with the government on these issues, given the nature of the threat. How can we innovate in the policy realm to help enable that?

I can give you two examples. We have learned that if you make your retirement system opt-in, in general you get about a 45 to 50 percent take rate among your employees. If, however, you make your retirement system opt-out, you get a 95 percent take rate. There is no technical difference between those two things, but from a process standpoint they yield dramatically different results. Why? Because of the psychology of it. People are lazy. If you make them make a decision, they will find a reason not to do it. But if the option is “Here’s this good thing for you and all you have to do is just go along with it,” only a small percentage will say no. So what’s the cyber equivalent to that? How do we make cybersecurity opt-out rather than opt-in?

[snip]

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s